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SWCS_Student_Award Application_2015

Latornell Logo

[update: links have been verified in this posting]

Do you know of an aspiring student in conservation? Would they benefit from the assistance and networking opportunity provided by the Arthur D. Latornell Award of Merit?

Please pass along this website and the application for the 2015 A.D. Latornell Award of Merit to these students. This award was founded and is awarded annually by the Ontario Chapter of SWCS. The A.D. Latornell Award of Merit Program recognizes and celebrates Art's commitment and service to our Society and Ontario. Art was involved in virtually every aspect of resources conservation during his lifetime and was a role model for many beginning a career in conservation. This Award also provides significant publicity for the Chapter and helps promote the mission of the Society.

Students enrolled in college, Bachelor's or Master's programs in natural resources sciences and management are eligible. Ph.D. students are not eligible. There have been award winners from a wide range of disciplines in the past. Consider promoting to worthy students you have hired in the past.

Due date to receive applications is September 21, 2015.

The award winners are announced at the A.D. Latornell Conservation Symposium in Alliston, Tuesday November 17, 2015. Award winners are provided registration to attend that day to receive their award, as well as $600 and a year's membership in SWCS.

A review of the Chapter's A.D. Latornell Award of Merit Program was undertaken last year and it was decided to discontinue the professional (non-student) award in order to sustain the award and focus on young people in the field, whom Art took a particular interest in mentoring and developing. Additional changes may be considered for next year. If you are interested in setting the future direction for the award or in helping evaluate this year's applications please contact Award Committee Chair, Pamela Joosse at pamjoosse@gmail.com.

Please help promote the award to make sure those worthy of Art's legacy are considered.

Sincerely,
Pamela Joosse
Award Committee Chair

SWCS 2015 Annual Conference Logo

The 70th Annual SWCS Conference will be held 26-29 July 2015 in Greensboro, North Carolina. Full details are on the SWCS website. The theme is "Coming Home to Conservation: Putting Science into Practice". This is an excellent conference for anyone interested in soils and water management. This year's program looks particularly interesting including the different additional workshops you could attend.

One way the SWCS is moving forward on current environmental challenges is by incorporating the former National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) National Water Conference into the International Annual Conference, which will increase collaborative opportunities for land-grant based scientists and educators engaged in water issues. SWCS welcomes this addition to the already diverse audience and the enhancement it will provide to all conference participants.

Our very own board members will be giving presentations too. Jacqui Empson Laporte who works at the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs will present "Putting Technology to Work Leading to Real-Life Solutions: Aquahacking".

Pamela Joosse, who works at Agriculture & Agrifood Canada,  will present "Defining and Analyzing Agricultural Production Systems to Determine the Capacity to Make Soil and Nutrient
Management Improvements in the Canadian Lake Erie Basin".

Visit the SWCS.org website to see more details. The programme looks very interesting. Hope you can attend!

 

The 69th SWCS International Annual Conference is taking place 27-30 July in Lombard, Illinois, USA. From the Great Lakes to the coast, our use of the land impacts major bodies of water. Whether it be the large freshwater lakes of the United States and Canada, the Atlantic or Pacific Ocean; or the other lakes, seas, and oceans of the world, these terminal waters tell the story of what is happening upstream. This year, we consider challenges and progress in nutrient management, erosion and sediment control, nonpoint source and watershed policy, and other issues influencing the health and productivity of our soils and large water bodies. We have an opportunity to reflect upon decades of hard work and to acknowledge the progress of land managers, farmers, advisors, and scientists. We can also recognize failure and emerging problems, with a focus on innovatively moving forward to develop and implement best practices and improve outcomes. Collectively we can make waves in conservation by coming together to share ideas, explore opportunities, and face the challenge of our life on land and its impact on water